• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Photo

Telepathy (digital back for analog cameras)


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 stoppingdown

stoppingdown

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 569 posts
  • LocationGenoa / Milan, Italy

Posted 09 October 2017 - 01:42 PM

A few days ago I ran into my old Nikon FG, a completely manual/mechanical camera that I bought, used, a couple of years before switching to digital. I used it for a short time, but I enjoyed shooting something, once in a while, with a totally mechanical gear. Then, of course, it started collecting dust. All of a sudden I thought about posting here a totally useless topic, just for chatting, about the possibility of having a digital back - with minimal electronics - to be used with such mechanical cameras. I don't think I'd even buy it (unless it was really cheap); just to guess why there are lots of out-of-mass-market, kickstarter-like projects around, and why not that one.

Et voilà, just read:

 

https://www.kickstar...-for-35mm-analo


stoppingdown.net

 

Sony a6300, Sony a6000, Sony NEX-6, Sony E 10-18mm F4 OSS, Sony Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* E 16-70mm F4 ZA OSS, Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS, Sigma 150-600mm ƒ/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary, Samyang 12mm ƒ/2, Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN | A, Meyer Gorlitz Trioplan 100mm ƒ/2.8, Samyang 8mm ƒ/3.5 fish-eye II | Zenit Helios 44-2 58mm ƒ/2 
Plus some legacy Nikkor lenses.

#2 JoJu

JoJu

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,838 posts
  • LocationSwitzerland

Posted 09 October 2017 - 02:39 PM

Pity it's about a decade too late. I also don't see the advantage of going back to 8, 12 or 16 MP when you get a used 36 MP D800 for around 1000 bucks if you're lucky. Most of all, I'm afraid that bodies lying around for more than a decade will grow some mechanical issues.

 

On the other side: I saw a second hand Leica R8 with 4 lenses for around 1100.- I just doubt that this evoce will be available for many old bodies - there was never a standard for their backs.



#3 stoppingdown

stoppingdown

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 569 posts
  • LocationGenoa / Milan, Italy

Posted 09 October 2017 - 02:44 PM

The design also looks cumbersome - can somebody explain (or guess) why they decided to go with a glass focusing screen, that is then projected on the sensor, instead of directly place the sensor in the place where film was?

 

PS I don't think is a matter of megapixels... one would go that route just for the fun of using an old camera...


stoppingdown.net

 

Sony a6300, Sony a6000, Sony NEX-6, Sony E 10-18mm F4 OSS, Sony Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* E 16-70mm F4 ZA OSS, Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS, Sigma 150-600mm ƒ/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary, Samyang 12mm ƒ/2, Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN | A, Meyer Gorlitz Trioplan 100mm ƒ/2.8, Samyang 8mm ƒ/3.5 fish-eye II | Zenit Helios 44-2 58mm ƒ/2 
Plus some legacy Nikkor lenses.

#4 mst

mst

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,095 posts
  • LocationWesterwald, Germany

Posted 09 October 2017 - 02:49 PM

It's a matter of sensor size. They use a smartphone camera module (so tiny sensor) to photograph the glass screen.


Editor
photozone.de

#5 stoppingdown

stoppingdown

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 569 posts
  • LocationGenoa / Milan, Italy

Posted 09 October 2017 - 02:53 PM

It's a matter of sensor size. They use a smartphone camera module (so tiny sensor) to photograph the glass screen.

 

Thanks. So it's a way to keep costs down. So, back to my original point, I suppose that a "regular" back, APS-C sensor would be way too expensive for the little niche of market of this thing.


stoppingdown.net

 

Sony a6300, Sony a6000, Sony NEX-6, Sony E 10-18mm F4 OSS, Sony Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* E 16-70mm F4 ZA OSS, Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS, Sigma 150-600mm ƒ/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary, Samyang 12mm ƒ/2, Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN | A, Meyer Gorlitz Trioplan 100mm ƒ/2.8, Samyang 8mm ƒ/3.5 fish-eye II | Zenit Helios 44-2 58mm ƒ/2 
Plus some legacy Nikkor lenses.

#6 JoJu

JoJu

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,838 posts
  • LocationSwitzerland

Posted 09 October 2017 - 03:38 PM

I was looking at Kickstarter. It might be a good sign if someone has a keyboard which never saw a cleaning cloth since it came out of the box, but I consider typing on it as disgusting and contagious, so I'll pass for sure.

 

So they're kind of photographing a matte screen with a cellphone lens? I double pass.  :D

 

Plus, the back doesn't look much smaller tahn of the IQ bacls for Phase One  :wacko: At least, you cannot use the viewfinder anymore.



#7 Rover

Rover

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,576 posts
  • LocationRussia

Posted 09 October 2017 - 04:31 PM

This looks awkward in the extreme. Who might need it apart from those with hardcore cases of nostalgia when the used market is awash in second hand DSLRs?..  :blink:



#8 toni-a

toni-a

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,280 posts
  • LocationLebanon

Posted 09 October 2017 - 05:37 PM

the problem, how would the camera know you are shooting ?

a more practical alternative: just use film, you can even scan to a RAW / DNG file

with film you might maybe not get the same quality but get  at least more enjoyment and you will notice  your keepers rate will rise a lot



#9 Arthur Macmillan

Arthur Macmillan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 191 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 09 October 2017 - 05:43 PM

The allure of the old 35mm cameras was their manual focusing using split screens and such.  If they gave you that it might be fun!



#10 obican

obican

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts

Posted 09 October 2017 - 06:00 PM

Just shoot black and white film and develop it at home. It's not expensive, nor really cumbersome.



#11 dave's clichés

dave's clichés

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,737 posts

Posted 09 October 2017 - 06:16 PM

     I can't think of a more convoluted and IQ degrading way of taking an image...... you start with a perfectly good film camera and lens, then you replace the film with a ground screen (or whatever)....and then pass the result through a who knows what sort of optic and catch it on a very small sensor....

 

     and all of that with a huge encumbrance of a box behind and a huge grip..........

 

     all in all I'm pinching myself.......is this really happening?

 

     ...... 



#12 Brightcolours

Brightcolours

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,832 posts
  • LocationThe Netherlands

Posted 09 October 2017 - 08:13 PM

Luckily, like the majority of kickstarted projects, it might not really happen.



#13 Arthur Macmillan

Arthur Macmillan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 191 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 10 October 2017 - 12:25 AM

In case my meaning did not come across, what I meant was that the manual focusing system seems really good on the manual focus bodies that I have from my legacy glass buying days.  It seems really easy to get sharp focus with the view finders and  MF lenses that were made for each other.  It also doesn't hurt that the cameras and lenses were often very compact.  MF with modern cameras is much more difficult.  Anyways, I never have used any of the old cameras that simply were the cap on the back of the lens that I wanted, but I have looked through the viewfinder and got a feel of what is was like.  It will probably never be practical to make a digital camera this way, but it might be fun if some camera maker decided to make a low end MF DSLR camera for legacy lenses.  It would have a low cost 35mm sensor and depend on the long throw, parfocal, and one touch lenses of the old days.  The camera would probably cost the same as an entry level dslr, but the lenses would be practically free.  And it might be fun to use such a camera.

 

I have many old bodies that should probably be thrown away, but I just throw them in a storage bin.  I have Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Minolta, Pentax, Ricoh, Mamiya, Konica, and more.  The Canon and Nikon seem like focusing them is simple.  Of course, not having taken photos with them it is only an impression that the focusing is very easy.  It sure seems like it is, though.



#14 Brightcolours

Brightcolours

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,832 posts
  • LocationThe Netherlands

Posted 10 October 2017 - 07:07 AM

Arthur, I use a DSLR (Canon EOS 6D) with quite a few of my lenses being manual focus (Voigtlander 20mm f3.5, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f3.5, Canon FL 55mm f1.2, Nikkor-S 55mm f1.2, Nikkor-H 85mm f1.8, Nikkor-Q 135mm f3.5, Nikkor "K" 135mm f2.8, to name a few). Because of the larger aperture MF lenses, I put a Canon Eg-S focus screen in it, which shows the DOF more accurately, especially for manual focus. I find it practical enough, it seems like what you want already exists, especially since the price of the 6D has come down a lot.

 

Manual focus lenses you can put on the 6D: EOS EF mount, Nikon F-mount, Olympus OM mount, Pentax PK mount (after some slight modification), Contax/Yashica C/Y mount, Leica R-mount, M42 mount, Tamron Adaptal mount. You can convert the mount of many Canon FL/FD mount lenses to EF mount, and some Minolta lenses.

 

3475585.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=ASIAIYHNAZWEA

 

E71660D37A3E4BE584B801E42DF374C3.jpg

4B4AD44C69DD498B80CBDA34CE861CE2.jpg



#15 toni-a

toni-a

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,280 posts
  • LocationLebanon

Posted 10 October 2017 - 08:40 AM

 

E71660D37A3E4BE584B801E42DF374C3.jpg

 

 

This one seems to suffer from front focus



#16 toni-a

toni-a

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,280 posts
  • LocationLebanon

Posted 10 October 2017 - 08:42 AM


 

 

4B4AD44C69DD498B80CBDA34CE861CE2.jpg

 

 

Excellent work   :)






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users



© by photozone.de