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Yesterday JoJu had pictures of bees in flight in a thread. :o Wow, I like that

Last two summers I spent lots of time trying to shoot bumblebees in flight- lots of shots, don´t know how many thousands, but I got some keepers. Used a Pana GX8 and Oly 60/f2.8 macro. With the setting 4k-photo (30b/s) I could catch the bumblebees sometimes.

Just wonder how many on this forum have experience from shooting bees, bumblebees and other insects (yes JoJu, Daves cl... and Stopping down), but someone else?

Here are two pictures from 2017:

    I've been trying to get that great bumble bee shot for ever!

 

      ....a close frame filling shot   .....high shutter speeds are needed, around 1/2500 sec...

 

  .......small apertures are needed to get the depth of field leading to the inevitable high ISOs.

 

  It's a great way to shoot off a thousand images only to find you have got not one perfect example....well after much shutter wear I finally got this one!
And where are the wings?  Huh

 

:lol:

 

Cool shot!

      However Humming moths are easier to catch....this ones's a Broad-bordered bee Hawkmoth! 

 

 

    Here at least you can see the wings!!!

:blink:

 

Stunning! Because of a ton of cool details and one for sure is the wings with their transparency which still shows it's legs. Wow.

Is you humming moth a colleague to this one?

 

[Image: _DSC4975-X2.jpg]

 

here it's called a "pigeon taily" (taily meaning the same belittlement as "thingy").

Quote:    I've been trying to get that great bumble bee shot for ever!

 

      ....a close frame filling shot   .....high shutter speeds are needed, around 1/2500 sec...

 

  .......small apertures are needed to get the depth of field leading to the inevitable high ISOs.

 

  It's a great way to shoot off a thousand images only to find you have got not one perfect example....well after much shutter wear I finally got this one!
 

Most often I set shutterspeed to 1/1000 and aperture 1/f4 - 1/f5.6 and ISO not higher than 800 (both pictures I posted yesterday),  but here are two pics with different settings. The first one is from 2016: 1/1600, f/5.6, ISO 800. The second one from this year where the bumblebee is just leaving the flower: 1/640, 1/f5.6, ISO 800.  [ATTACHMENT NOT FOUND][ATTACHMENT NOT FOUND]

Could it be that your screen is set to very bright? One of the bumblebees is very dark

    Bruvvers I shouldn't wonder!    Wink

Quote:Could it be that your screen is set to very bright? One of the bumblebees is very dark
This bumblebee is dark - black and orange.

http://www.bumblebee.org home page:
Bombus lapidarius is probably the most easily recognised species with its black body and bright orange tail.
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