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Full Version: I'm starting to feel an astro itch ...
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I'm still not sure whether this can be a really sustainable investment (reads: I would really use it beyond the initial rush).

I'm also wondering whether I shall start with the basics or - because if this is going to be a thing - with something that provides a little more.

A basic thingy would be a "Star Adventurer Pro" 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIwuidp9rCs
or maybe this
https://www.skywatcherusa.com/products/eqm-35-mount

I still have the old EOS 5D II which I could convert to Astro - although I may do that later on really.

I suppose that the start would be about some ultra-wide landscape shots and 300mm-ish nebulas.

Now ... can somebody talk me out of this to order to keep my sanity or tell me that this is not a stupid idea? ;-)
Sorry, can't talk you out of this, Klaus. Smile

Beyond just star/sky photography it would be great for nightscape photography in general, with or without light painting in combination with great starry skies.

As to lenses, UWA, if you want to keep it "cheap", you could consider one of the Samyang UWA lenses, as a lot of them are great for sky / star photography, with little to no astigmatism, even wide open, beating many of the much more expensive options. There even are AF versions of some of these lenses for EOS.

Of course, they can be used with the Canon adapter on the EOS R as well Smile. And if you'd want, they can be adapted to MFT too, with or without speedbooster Smile.

Persoanlly I am not into sky and star photography, but I do like landscapes a lot, so I went even wider, the Samyang XP Premium 10 F/3.5. This lens is IMO absolutely stellar at F/8, but less so at larger apertures, due to some field curvature and light fall-off in the corners (obviously). However, it is better than the Canon 11-24 F/4L at the UWA side, and comes at less than 1/3 of the price of the latter over here. No AF for this lens, but colour wise they render similarly. It is quite a large lens, however, and F/8 is not really for star scapes, so one of the 14 mm options might be a better choice for you.

Kind regards, Wim
Well, I've ordered the Sony FE 20mm f/1.8 - and based on other reviews out there, it won't get any better than this for a fast ultra-wide.
I've heard good things about the Samyang XP Premium 10 F/3.5 - but ... that's too wide for normal photography IMHO.
The Sony FE 20mm f1.8 will pair great with an Astro-converted 5D mkII. Oh, wait... ;-P
What does this mean?    ;-P
1. Do you have easy access to place with low humidity and/or high altitude?
2. I assume that you can find place with less light pollution, Am I right?
It's well worth looking at DPreview's "Astrophophotography" forum .....

.... there are some very talented guys posting valuable info there ...... and some excellent images!!
(06-30-2020, 11:37 AM)Klaus Wrote: [ -> ]Well, I've ordered the Sony FE 20mm f/1.8 - and based on other reviews out there, it won't get any better than this for a fast ultra-wide.
I've heard good things about the Samyang XP Premium 10 F/3.5 - but ... that's too wide for normal photography IMHO.
Ah, different body then Smile. You may find 20 mm FF is not wide enough, though.

As to the Samyang 10 mm: I already found on a couple occasions that it isn't always wide enough Smile. However, fisheye wasn't the solution either, as defishin ggenerally does not result in great IQ Smile.

Kind regards, Wim
(06-30-2020, 11:47 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: [ -> ]The Sony FE 20mm f1.8 will pair great with an Astro-converted 5D mkII. Oh, wait... ;-P

The logic is actually very simple.

For ultra-wide shots I can take the Sony 20mm/A7R II - because the landscape requires its natural colors thus I can go for an unconverted camera. After all, I have a few options here. ;-)

For nebulas I can take the converted 5D II with some telescope or cheapish tele. 
E.g. this guy here ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WuBKfo_KMo ) is using a Tamron 150-600mm - and he's doing astro workshops using such setups. Now I wouldn't choose a Tamron, of course ... ;-) ... but this provides a direction.

However, let's come back to my question.

Is astrophotography really worth it? Ultra-wide shots of the Milkyway - Ok - this is a no-brainer because it doesn't really require any extra (specialized) gear.
However, is shooting nebulas really a thing other than just an eternal hunt for evermore perfect shots burning more and more money in the quest.
The amount of "composition" involved here is rather limited after all.
Klaus, knowing that you love the great outdoors it is definitely worth it. Especially if you venture in areas with low light pollution. As far as equipment I would suggest checking the Sigma 14-24 DN and Vello Shutter Boss remote trigger (wired). I find it absolutely great to be out there between sunset and nautical night. Plus now your nights are long and the days are short.
PhotoPills very helpful.
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