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250MP anyone?
#11
Deleted.

#12
I am not sure whether Canon is creating content for their marketing department, or technology break through, which is beneficial to the final result - great print. I f true, It will change the workflow for sure.
#13
My earlier comment wasn't aimed specifically at anyone, but a general observation. I can certainly think of personal uses for high(er) MP sensors, even if there is a lot of people who can't see the point in it.

The 120MP model doesn't state the sensor size that I've seen so far. Again I'd be interested if it was APS-C and affordably priced, which means it'll almost certainly be FF and priced sky high. Well above the 5Ds anyway.
<a class="bbc_url" href="http://snowporing.deviantart.com/">dA</a> Canon 7D2, 7D, 5D2, 600D, 450D, 300D IR modified, 1D, EF-S 10-18, 15-85, EF 35/2, 85/1.8, 135/2, 70-300L, 100-400L, MP-E65, Zeiss 2/50, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300/2.8, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Olympus E-P1, Panasonic 20/1.7, Sony HX9V, Fuji X100.
#14
Quote:...

The 120MP model doesn't state the sensor size that I've seen so far. Again I'd be interested if it was APS-C and affordably priced, which means it'll almost certainly be FF and priced sky high. Well above the 5Ds anyway.
 

Since even medium format sensors don't go over 80 MP (but maybe my information is already outdated), I'm looking forward to the price surprise as well. I'm also curious about the lenses and the noise of the sensor.
#15
Let's wait for DXO to get their teeth into the sensor, as they don't include resolution only dynamic range, colour depth and ISO scores, it will probably come out marginally worse than the 7DMkI!

 

Apparently this new Canon 250Mps body will also be fitted with a built in electric razor so you can keep yourself clean-shaven whilst opening the gargantuan files in Photoshop! !

Dave's clichés
#16
I'd love one, but I would not trade my 70D for it.  For those really close macros, or ultra-long telephoto shots it would be a whole new level of performance.  But, even if it did handle like my 70D the processing power needed to manipulate and store my photos would allow for only occasional use. 

 

But...seriously?  Is there a photographer here that wouldn't love to have on just to play with?  Imagine the Moon or Saturn or Jupiter photographed from a secluded clear location?  I would like to have that!

 

I admit I am skeptical about performance I have no way of verifying.  Especially one involving a company making claims that no independent source is verifying.

 

For example combination...blah, blah, blah "digital magnification"....

 

And then that bit about for special surveillance work...Meaning what.  Big brother will be using this technology while us common folk settle for much less.  I see this as the sorry wave of the future.  Just as Adobe, and other software makers dream of a world were only the elite can have full featured programs and the rest of the world can make use with stripped down products.  Personally, I hate that.  Make the best product you can make and price it for all of your customers.  Of course, my philosophy ignores the real world.

 

Top camera, top software, top education.  Just not available for me.


Still, my 70D can do a lot.  My Photoshop CS2 can do a lot.  And my teacher, "curiosity" sometimes gets me through with a little help from the generous souls out there how share their knowledge.

 

 

#17
I wouldn't use it on the moon, unless they get the framerate up some more, or you are very patient. Actually, processing it would take a while too so maybe you will need that either way. Because the moon doesn't vary much over a short time, it is already not too difficult to do a mosaic if you want high resolution. It could be a little easier to grab it in one go than a mosaic though.

Saturn or Jupiter are very different. Here you will be optically limited. I've tried going up to 6m focal length and they still fit on my astro imaging sensor which for practical purposes is 10x crop factor. Scaling that up for APS-H, do you have some 46m focal length optics lying around? On the flip side, Jupiter spins very fast. A very rough rule of thumb is you might have a couple of minutes before its rotation is detectable. This is a problem because unless you have perfect sky conditions, air will move and you need many frames to cherry pick the best, reduce noise, then calculate it out. I arbitrarily pick at least 1000 frames or much more in my less than ideal typical conditions. 5fps isn't going to cut it, even if you use de-rotation software on it. The astro-camera I use outputs raw video at 60fps which is reasonable for this type of job.

In short, use the right tool for the job.

Sticking with space though, this could be a killer for deep sky imaging if you need to cover a large area at high resolution in one go. For example, those that are searching for moving objects close to Earth, or other transient astronomical phenomenon like supernovas. Time is of the essence with various trade-offs to be made, so even here it isn't a free lunch.
<a class="bbc_url" href="http://snowporing.deviantart.com/">dA</a> Canon 7D2, 7D, 5D2, 600D, 450D, 300D IR modified, 1D, EF-S 10-18, 15-85, EF 35/2, 85/1.8, 135/2, 70-300L, 100-400L, MP-E65, Zeiss 2/50, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300/2.8, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Olympus E-P1, Panasonic 20/1.7, Sony HX9V, Fuji X100.
#18
Popo-

 

It's pretty awesome that you have tackled the astro-photography with such dedication.  My ventures into this field have been limited to shots of the moon from a tripod, and my results have been best with Tamron SP 500 f/8 mirror and Canon 70D. 

 

I like the thought of long exposure distant space shots, but living on the central coast of California, the night sky is seldom clear.  Is the rotation problem easily solved with affordable software?  Someday I'd like to try it.  I guess I figured that using a very fast lens it might be possible to take multiple shots and superimpose them and end up with slightly exaggerated points due to the variation in point of view.  And that way at least get a very starry sky.  After hearing about your super techniques my plan doesn't seem very ambitious.


Anyway from what I've seen really dense sensors don't do all that well with colors.  I'd much rather have a medium format digital with a leaf shutter if I had the money for this new camera.  I'd even prefer a Canon 5D Mark III.  Either one would give me capabilities that I could use every day!

#19
Light pollution might be the biggest problem, as it is for me. There are some filters that can help a lot, but are no substitute for going somewhere really dark.

What rotation? If you mean Jupiter, look up winjupos software. If you mean the rotation of the stars in the sky, yes, software can re-align shots for the stars, but you have the problem that the field of view covered will change through the series. You can get away with shorter durations depending on the focal length and pixel size, to prevent star trails. For free stacking software, I believe DeepSkyStacker is popular but I never really got to grips with it myself, and I use some commercial software instead.

[ATTACHMENT NOT FOUND]

For example, attached is what I think was "Comet C/2011 L4 PanSTARRS" taken in 2013. I didn't write it down then, but it was the significantly visible one that year. The comet is the lower bright object, and the andromeda galaxy is the upper object. This was taken on a fixed tripod about 5 minutes walk from my house. Looking at the raw files, I appear to have use Canon 600D, 135mm at f/2. Exposure 5 seconds, ISO3200. A light pollution filter was fitted. Even at 5 seconds, the stars were clearly trailing by several pixels when viewed 100%. With hindsight, maybe I could or should have gone even shorter. That was a stack of 50 shots. No, it isn't a great shot, but you can get something even with basic kit like this. If I had used a tracking mount, I could really increase the exposures and pull out more detail. This was not possible since my other kit was too heavy to move easily, and I didn't have line of sight from my house due to its low position in the sky.
<a class="bbc_url" href="http://snowporing.deviantart.com/">dA</a> Canon 7D2, 7D, 5D2, 600D, 450D, 300D IR modified, 1D, EF-S 10-18, 15-85, EF 35/2, 85/1.8, 135/2, 70-300L, 100-400L, MP-E65, Zeiss 2/50, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300/2.8, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Olympus E-P1, Panasonic 20/1.7, Sony HX9V, Fuji X100.
#20
Thanks for the suggestions!  I sometimes will pay for a commercial program if it is a lot easier to use.  I'll have to take a look at whats out there.

 

 

I meant rotation of the stars in the sky, or...Earth's rotation really!  That's actually an interesting photo you took.  I think it is a combination of light pollution, moisture in the air, and even the atmosphere itself.  At 8 or 9 thousand feet in the mountains the sky is so breathtaking, it doesn't really seem worthwhile to photograph the sky from down here.  But those old stargazing days were before I discovered photography!

  


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