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sneak preview: Canon EF 28mm f/2.8 USM IS
#1
[url="http://photozone.smugmug.com/Reviews/canon28f28is"]http://photozone.smugmug.com/Reviews/canon28f28is[/url]
#2
Why IS in a 28mm lens but not the 35, 50 or 85 primes or indeed the 17-40 or 24-70 zoom? I have the 17-40 and it doesn't need IS IMHO. Look forward to the test and your opinion of the value of IS in a WA lens.



BTW Klaus, are you preparing for Oktoberfest, or what?
#3
[quote name='HarryLally' timestamp='1348950955' post='20428']

Why IS in a 28mm lens but not the 35, 50 or 85 primes or indeed the 17-40 or 24-70 zoom? I have the 17-40 and it doesn't need IS IMHO. Look forward to the test and your opinion of the value of IS in a WA lens.



BTW Klaus, are you preparing for Oktoberfest, or what?

[/quote]



The sample images ARE from the Octoberfest. The name is a bit misleading - it always starts ~2 weeks prior of October and end at the first weekend in October.

I've been there once of partying this year and that's really enough. [Image: biggrin.gif]
#4
[quote name='HarryLally' timestamp='1348950955' post='20428']

Why IS in a 28mm lens but not the 35, 50 or 85 primes or indeed the 17-40 or 24-70 zoom? I have the 17-40 and it doesn't need IS IMHO. Look forward to the test and your opinion of the value of IS in a WA lens.



BTW Klaus, are you preparing for Oktoberfest, or what?

[/quote]

This lens is specifically meant for dslr video, as is the 24 F/2.8 IS. And it being F/2.8 brings IS into the realm of possibilities (relatively small lens elements). The fast primes are built rather tightly, especially the fast ones (little to no space left between elements and groups), and have very large glass elements. Adding IS would require a complete redesign, add elements and groups, and the question really is how easy it would be to do, and how cost effective, apart from potential issues with decentering (larger with larger elements), bokeh, etc.



Kind regards, Wim
Gear: Canon EOS R with 3 primes and 1 zoom, 4 EF-R adapters, Canon EOS 5 (analog), 9 Canon EF primes, a lone Canon EF zoom, 2 extenders, 2 converters, extension tubes, an accessory plague, and an Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II and Pen F with 12 primes, 6 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ...
#5
[quote name='wim' timestamp='1348953502' post='20430']

This lens is specifically meant for dslr video, as is the 24 F/2.8 IS. And it being F/2.8 brings IS into the realm of possibilities (relatively small lens elements). The fast primes are built rather tightly, especially the fast ones (little to no space left between elements and groups), and have very large glass elements. Adding IS would require a complete redesign, add elements and groups, and the question really is how easy it would be to do, and how cost effective, apart from potential issues with decentering (larger with larger elements), bokeh, etc.



Kind regards, Wim

[/quote]



Well, this one is certainly fine for still.

For video it would make more sense to go for STM.
#6
[quote name='Klaus' timestamp='1348993396' post='20432']

Well, this one is certainly fine for still.

For video it would make more sense to go for STM.

[/quote]

Of course, it is good for stills too.



However, the initial pictures of this lens were all on EF-mount video dslrs and Canon's new range of video cameras. The blurbs even said something along the lines of the IS being implemented for video.



Kind regards, Wim
Gear: Canon EOS R with 3 primes and 1 zoom, 4 EF-R adapters, Canon EOS 5 (analog), 9 Canon EF primes, a lone Canon EF zoom, 2 extenders, 2 converters, extension tubes, an accessory plague, and an Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II and Pen F with 12 primes, 6 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ...
#7
[quote name='wim' timestamp='1349000927' post='20433']

Of course, it is good for stills too.



However, the initial pictures of this lens were all on EF-mount video dslrs and Canon's new range of video cameras. The blurbs even said something along the lines of the IS being implemented for video.



Kind regards, Wim

[/quote]

If so, why aren't these lenses equipped with STM which was touted as a video feature? It seems as if the decision making at Canon is pretty chaotic (no video AF on 5D III while it's there on the 650D; the sheer existence of lenses like this and the 24 with no comparable longer lenses; the abovementioned lack of "video-friendly" STM motor...)
#8
[quote name='Rover' timestamp='1349016181' post='20435']

If so, why aren't these lenses equipped with STM which was touted as a video feature? It seems as if the decision making at Canon is pretty chaotic (no video AF on 5D III while it's there on the 650D; the sheer existence of lenses like this and the 24 with no comparable longer lenses; the abovementioned lack of "video-friendly" STM motor...)

[/quote]

The STM motor was only introduced later.



Regards, Wim
Gear: Canon EOS R with 3 primes and 1 zoom, 4 EF-R adapters, Canon EOS 5 (analog), 9 Canon EF primes, a lone Canon EF zoom, 2 extenders, 2 converters, extension tubes, an accessory plague, and an Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II and Pen F with 12 primes, 6 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ...
#9
[quote name='Klaus' timestamp='1348993396' post='20432']

Well, this one is certainly fine for still.

For video it would make more sense to go for STM.

[/quote]

This lens is meant for video for professional use (or rather, that is why they chose to implement IS in it). AF for video mainly only for amateurs. Different markets...
#10
[quote name='wim' timestamp='1349017305' post='20436']

The STM motor was only introduced later.



Regards, Wim

[/quote]

But not that much later, since technology like this isn't developed overnight. It might've made sense to wait knowing that a technology like this is coming. But oh well... these primes are of zero interest to me, and even if my 16-35 dies I wouldn't choose an overpriced, slow (for the FL range) prime instead.
  


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