Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Mama never told me about handling internal focusing & zooming lens best practices!
#1
When you have a pouch that hangs vertically it seems natural not to put it in the case lens side down.  Also when stored with the base down, you naturally make the lens it shortest physical length. 

But with lenses that don't change length, I haven't really been thinking about it.  In fact my prime macros are pretty nearly always close the their closest focus when I put them in a pouch.  If the lens is front up the elements are working against the strain of gravity.

Everyone loves their 70-200mm zooms.  Here is the thing, mine is almost always set at 200mm (longest physically --- well I guess at least, it is a design decision, but very often longest zoom has the furthest position of the front element from the base of the lens). 

It is a little embarrassing to have to come and ask the experts about something I have been taking for granted.  Just assuming I could drop my IF focusing lens in the bag without a care in the world.

The reason I am finally thinking about it is my usual one.  Something went wrong with the focusing of my EF 70-200 F/4L (i) IS USM lens.  It is not completely broken.  But sometimes when I turn the focus ring in MF, or even the camera attempts the same feat in AF, it will not make it to the MFD.  Sometimes getting only as far as 2.5m.

The are some rituals which can help.  For instance, hold the lens horizontally, and talk to it in a soothing voice.  You see the connection?  The elements do not have to work against gravity. 

Aside from the inevitable, 'Send the lens to be repaired', I was hoping to hear what you, who have handled this type of lens for years have any advice on "Best Practices" for carrying your IF/IZ lenses vertically in a case or camera bag.

Please be kind.  Most of my experience is with less modern lens designs.  I somehow thought this type of lens was bullet proof!

Thanks in advance!  I come here for advice because you guys know a universe of information.  But even if you don't know, I can still learn from your experiences.  What works for you?

-Arthur
#2
Get a Sony / Fuji / Nikon / Leica and move on Big Grin

It was you who didn't want to hear the "Send the lens to be repaired" sentence, but I'm afraid that's what should happen here. I never heard or read in manuals advice for taking gravity into account while storing or transporting a lens. All other kinds of precautions like no direct sunlight, keep away from water, damp and moisture, avoid dust and sand (so basically keep the lens in it's box, its' very safe in there).

But did your Mama told you that you always should stay to the truth (because I bet she didn't, no adult does, too buy with gravity) and eventually mention that the lens might have had a little tiny bit less than soft contact with the ground? Only once of course and with a very friendly looking ground?
#3
Depends on the lens too. Most lenses will be fine however you store them but some lenses have weak spots. Canon EF 50/1.4 is such an offender. If you focus it to the closest distance, it is extremely vulnerable and even a relatively light tap on the front filter ring will break the plastic helicoids inside the lens. Just focus at the minimum distance and put your camera and lens on the table, lens side down. Congratulations, you just got a broken lens Big Grin.
#4
(07-23-2018, 11:41 AM)obican Wrote: Depends on the lens too. Most lenses will be fine however you store them but some lenses have weak spots. Canon EF 50/1.4 is such an offender. If you focus it to the closest distance, it is extremely vulnerable and even a relatively light tap on the front filter ring will break the plastic helicoids inside the lens. Just focus at the minimum distance and put your camera and lens on the table, lens side down. Congratulations, you just got a broken lens Big Grin.

Victim was talking about IF lenses, no?
IF = no expanding elements?
#5
Those could still have internal weak points at certain focus/zoom positions as well. External force wouldn't make any difference on them but a shock would still damage some delicate internal parts.
#6
(07-23-2018, 02:01 AM)Arthur Macmillan Wrote: When you have a pouch that hangs vertically it seems natural not to put it in the case lens side down.  Also when stored with the base down, you naturally make the lens it shortest physical length. 

But with lenses that don't change length, I haven't really been thinking about it.  In fact my prime macros are pretty nearly always close the their closest focus when I put them in a pouch.  If the lens is front up the elements are working against the strain of gravity.

Everyone loves their 70-200mm zooms.  Here is the thing, mine is almost always set at 200mm (longest physically --- well I guess at least, it is a design decision, but very often longest zoom has the furthest position of the front element from the base of the lens). 

It is a little embarrassing to have to come and ask the experts about something I have been taking for granted.  Just assuming I could drop my IF focusing lens in the bag without a care in the world.

The reason I am finally thinking about it is my usual one.  Something went wrong with the focusing of my EF 70-200 F/4L (i) IS USM lens.  It is not completely broken.  But sometimes when I turn the focus ring in MF, or even the camera attempts the same feat in AF, it will not make it to the MFD.  Sometimes getting only as far as 2.5m.

The are some rituals which can help.  For instance, hold the lens horizontally, and talk to it in a soothing voice.  You see the connection?  The elements do not have to work against gravity. 

Aside from the inevitable, 'Send the lens to be repaired', I was hoping to hear what you, who have handled this type of lens for years have any advice on "Best Practices" for carrying your IF/IZ lenses vertically in a case or camera bag.

Please be kind.  Most of my experience is with less modern lens designs.  I somehow thought this type of lens was bullet proof!

Thanks in advance!  I come here for advice because you guys know a universe of information.  But even if you don't know, I can still learn from your experiences.  What works for you?

-Arthur

Hi Arthur nice to hear from you again!

    Having delved into the interiors of a few Nikon lenses and had a similar fault with the AF-S 28-70mm where the lens would give up focusing near infinity...........I give you a few thoughts.....

      ......a common reason for this are the "ribbon connectors"....they are thin, robust and are self adhesively attached often in areas where "man has trouble going"...ie.  down the sides of the inner front barrel etc.
  Over the years they can become detached often lifting a corner which then rubs or catches the AF mechanism and then the fun begins.  Your gravity theory could well be caused by a ribbon connector hanging where it shouldn't be hence the orientation of the lens.
  I've also found that once the AF motor's movement is restricted a protection circuit switches it off (some Nikkors) which can throw up an error message, requiring the camera to be turned on/off to get restarted.
   
  It's worth confirming your AF sensor prism under the mirror is clean, a speck of dust can often give one the run around!

  Maybe your lens needs a visit to the lens doctor, it's a great lens after all..........

    All the best Dave
Dave's clichés
#7
(07-23-2018, 04:32 AM)JJ_SO Wrote: Get a Sony / Fuji / Nikon / Leica and move on Big Grin

....

But did your Mama told you that you always should stay to the truth (because I bet she didn't, no adult does, too buy with gravity) and eventually mention that the lens might have had a little tiny bit less than soft contact with the ground? Only once of course and with a very friendly looking ground?

I really don't go chasing after the latest fad lenses.  An EF 70-200mm F/4L IS USM lens is generally considered good enough for most people to manage getting an occasional satisfactory results. 

I don't remember dropping it.  Could be someone jealous of Canon lenses may have sabotaged it, however, I ask myself what type of photographer would attack some other photographer's lens when they are so happy with their own lenses Big Grin

...So maybe there is nothing to worry about in handling this type of lens.  It does seem as if the zoom and focus are held in place when lens is not on camera.  Just curious if there was a best practice...

(07-26-2018, 06:43 AM)davidmanze Wrote:
(07-23-2018, 02:01 AM)Arthur Macmillan Wrote: When you have a pouch that hangs vertically it seems natural not to put it in the case lens side down.  Also when stored with the base down, you naturally make the lens it shortest physical length. 

But with lenses that don't change length, I haven't really been thinking about it.  In fact my prime macros are pretty nearly always close the their closest focus when I put them in a pouch.  If the lens is front up the elements are working against the strain of gravity.

Everyone loves their 70-200mm zooms.  Here is the thing, mine is almost always set at 200mm (longest physically --- well I guess at least, it is a design decision, but very often longest zoom has the furthest position of the front element from the base of the lens). 

It is a little embarrassing to have to come and ask the experts about something I have been taking for granted.  Just assuming I could drop my IF focusing lens in the bag without a care in the world.

The reason I am finally thinking about it is my usual one.  Something went wrong with the focusing of my EF 70-200 F/4L (i) IS USM lens.  It is not completely broken.  But sometimes when I turn the focus ring in MF, or even the camera attempts the same feat in AF, it will not make it to the MFD.  Sometimes getting only as far as 2.5m.

The are some rituals which can help.  For instance, hold the lens horizontally, and talk to it in a soothing voice.  You see the connection?  The elements do not have to work against gravity. 

Aside from the inevitable, 'Send the lens to be repaired', I was hoping to hear what you, who have handled this type of lens for years have any advice on "Best Practices" for carrying your IF/IZ lenses vertically in a case or camera bag.

Please be kind.  Most of my experience is with less modern lens designs.  I somehow thought this type of lens was bullet proof!

Thanks in advance!  I come here for advice because you guys know a universe of information.  But even if you don't know, I can still learn from your experiences.  What works for you?

-Arthur

Hi Arthur nice to hear from you again!

    Having delved into the interiors of a few Nikon lenses and had a similar fault with the AF-S 28-70mm where the lens would give up focusing near infinity...........I give you a few thoughts.....

      ......a common reason for this are the "ribbon connectors"....they are thin, robust and are self adhesively attached often in areas where "man has trouble going"...ie.  down the sides of the inner front barrel etc.
  Over the years they can become detached often lifting a corner which then rubs or catches the AF mechanism and then the fun begins.  Your gravity theory could well be caused by a ribbon connector hanging where it shouldn't be hence the orientation of the lens.
  I've also found that once the AF motor's movement is restricted a protection circuit switches it off (some Nikkors) which can throw up an error message, requiring the camera to be turned on/off to get restarted.
   
...

  Maybe your lens needs a visit to the lens doctor, it's a great lens after all..........

    All the best Dave

Dave, good to hear from you too!

I have delved into a few lenses myself and have seen both types of errors to which you refer.  I have drawn the line at opening up a lens this complex.  Although I have not given up on the thought that it might "fix itself". 

I am pretty sure that the difficulty is with the USM motor itself, or a protection circuit.  This lens has a fluorite element, and Canon seems to go to great lengths to protect such lenses from excessive heat, such as the white coloring to reflect heat.  It seems to work best if it is not overly warm.

" Maybe your lens needs a visit to the lens doctor, it's a great lens after all.........."

This is true.  But I think I Have been having more fun with my smaller prime lenses lately.  I hoped owning might help me in portrait photography, but really prefer using the 100mm F/2.8L prime, or other lenses.  Smaller and the ability to get as close as necessary have brought me back to emphasizing my macro lenses.  It is a good lens though.  I'll just see how it works out.


P.S.
Don't tell JJ but I just may have gotten a grain or two of sand on the lens.  Santa Cruz is a beach town, after all!
  


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)