Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Mirrorless and dust, did Canon find the solution ?
#1
As a user of Sony mirrorless and Canon SLR I noticed Sony is by far much prone to dust than 7D2, while the issue is non existent with Canon SLR (at least for me) it is a serious problem with my Sony, which is normal since in a SLR you always have the mirror closed when swapping lenses, which reduces dust to some amount.
with new EOS R :
  • "When the camera is switched off, the shutter closes and shields the sensor from dust if/when you change lenses."
https://www.imaging-resource.com/news/20...ess-camera
quite an interesting approach, but do you think it is a good idea ? exposing the shutter ???
#2
How often do you switch off the camera before changing lenses? better than nothing, for sure, but dust (and shorter flange distances) are a problem of ML.

And at the same time ML is the solution. DSLR also sucks dust in, yet the cleaning is more complicated (deeper mirror box, mirror needs to be powered to stay upwards)
#3
I think the old Sigma SLR cameras had a similar solution.
On the flip side, the dust that had, by then, entered the chamber would remain there. Smile
#4
...and eventually fly towards the sensor. It only takes a little bit of electrostatic.
#5
The net result, though, is probably going to be positive. Else they wouldn't have implemented it - I can be pretty sure they did a lot of testing before doing this. Smile
#6
Shutter being closed as the lens is off is an awful idea. One misaligned lens or adapter or one slip of a finger and your shutter is gone whereas an open sensor would've been fine as it'd be burried significantly deeper and much better protected by the light baffle around it.

And it's much cheaper and easier to change a sensor glass than a shutter. Also keep in mind that a scratch or dust on the sensor is not really such a big issue while a damaged shutter is.
#7
(09-05-2018, 03:06 PM)obican Wrote: Shutter being closed as the lens is off is an awful idea. One misaligned lens or adapter or one slip of a finger and your shutter is gone whereas an open sensor would've been fine as it'd be burried significantly deeper and much better protected by the light baffle around it.

And it's much cheaper and easier to change a sensor glass than a shutter. Also keep in mind that a scratch or dust on the sensor is not really such a big issue while a damaged shutter is.

?

How would you misalign a lens or adapter, or even slip a finger to touch the shutter, even with a shutter "only" lying, say 18 mm (taking it conservatively, it probably is 19.5 mm) deep into the body?

You won't be able to stick a lens or adapter that deep into the body, not even when holding it perpendicular to the camera mount. And I really wonder how one has to hold a lens or adapter to accidentally stick it into the body so far that you'd actually touch the shutter with a finger. Surely your fingers are around the lens well before the mount as you'd not be able to mount the lens at all. Besides that, the shutter is very flexible, and can handle more force than you might think.

BTW, have you ever inadvertently touched a mirror in a dslr or slr, with finger(s) or lens? That is very easy to touch compared to a shutter in a mirrorless camera. Shooting slr's since 1973 and dslr's since 2005 I personally have never managed to do so.

In short, IMO, this is just scare-mongering, and effectively a total non-issue.

Kind regards, Wim
Gear: a gaggle of Canon primes, a lone Canon zoom (sold 5D II recently Smile), an accessory plague, and an Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II, Pen F and Panasonic GM5 with 14 primes, 8 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ....
#8
I totally agree with Wim on this, 100%. The only issue I can think of is that with every lens switch you have en extra shutter actuation Wink
#9
I think a shutter is basically useless to change the lens. If there's dust or mositure to protect the sensor (glass) from, it will remain on the shutter. As soon as I'm done with lens change, allt his particles will not disappear in thin air, but remain between lens and sensor.
Also, all DSLRs have a closed shutter at the moment of lens change. Does it prevent any dust particle to finally land on the sensor? Not at all.

I rather prefer easy access to clean the sensor. That is a system downside of mirrorless (and interchangeable backs). The shutter is kind of false security and obican is right. In case of a defect it's an expensive repair. It doesn't matter if it's fingerprint or particle, the glass is easier to clean than a thin sheet of metal. You guys considered it's a marge larger hole in the body and less deep as well?
#10
The lens mount is rather large and if your lens or adapter has a small protrusion, it might hit the shutter as it's much closer to the mount than you think it is. Even some old m39 lenses might be serious offenders.

Also something tells me that if the shutter closes as soon as a lens is removed and only opens back up if the connection is reestablished, it might get tricky to use third party dumb adapters with no electrical contacts.
  


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)