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next OL lens test report: Canon RF 50mm f/1.2 USM L
#1
I quite like it ;-)

http://www.opticallimits.com/canon_eos_f...nonrf50f12
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
#2
Is the focus by wire acting linear? On Z, it's not.

Could you imagine to reduce the flicker problem for your bokeh/cat eye test with a ND filter?

I was fooling around with a camera at 9 fps. An alarm clock with 4 digit display acted the way that each shot only showed one digit per frame. Only with a slower shutter speed I could get all 4 numbers.

Pretty cool lens, that Canon.
#3
"Diffraction doesn't set in prior of f/11."
Odd that I see diffraction setting in at f4 in the chart ;-) , maybe rephrase that to "diffraction does not impact resolution much till f11"?

" If you really want to go down the dreadful route of using a converter for using Canon EF lenses, you could use all/most of these lenses albeit this remains cumbersome as all adapter solutions."
That should be "an adapter", and "cumbersome like all adapter solutions"

Indeed a very impressive lens. Good thing it has such a high price tag, as I really prefer OVFs.
#4
BC, you should try EOS R or Z. maybe you'd be surprised about their EVFs. I do have some little complaints about the one of the Z, but ot in terms of brightness or speed - not to mention the indication of exposure in manual mode.
#5
They (the all knowing internet) says that the Canon EOS R has the best EVF of the lot. The issues I have with EVFs are:
- An OVF gives a 3D feel, an EVF a 2D computer screen feel.
- With an OVF I get to imagine/explore the scene in a creative way, guessing what effects/the end result will be regarding what happens in bokeh. With an EVF/live view LCD, that part of my creative input is lost to the "computer screen".
- I have not met an EVF yet that does not give me a noticable lag and a flicker. I have always been quite sensitive to flicker of screens.

The last point may be gone with an EOS R or even a Nikon Z, but the 1st two will remain.

Of course, there are photos where live view/EVF is not hampering me, but for the other types of photos I do prefer OVF.
Here a live view image I took on the weekend with my EOS M:

.jpg   lighttraces2a.jpg (Size: 361.25 KB / Downloads: 14)
#6
Quote:OL said: From a value perspective, the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 HSM DG ART may be interesting but then again - what's the point of using an even bigger lens on a smallish camera. That would somehow defy the purposes of choosing a mirrorless system in the first place. 

I never will agree on this reduced perspective of mirrorless systems. Mirrorless systems which focus on film or sensor level all have the same advantage: no indirect focus system, you usually get what you see. Weight or size reduction is one side effect, but not the highest advantage.
#7
(12-04-2018, 12:06 PM)Brightcolours Wrote: They (the all knowing internet) says that the Canon EOS R has the best EVF of the lot. The issues I have with EVFs are:
- An OVF gives a 3D feel, an EVF a 2D computer screen feel.
- With an OVF I get to imagine/explore the scene in a creative way, guessing what effects/the end result will be regarding what happens in bokeh. With an EVF/live view LCD, that part of my creative input is lost to the "computer screen".
- I have not met an EVF yet that does not give me a noticable lag and a flicker. I have always been quite sensitive to flicker of screens.

The last point may be gone with an EOS R or even a Nikon Z, but the 1st two will remain.

Of course, there are photos where live view/EVF is not hampering me, but for the other types of photos I do prefer OVF.
Here a live view image I took on the weekend with my EOS M:
As to your points:
- 3D feel: that’s relative from a darkness/dimness POV. The darker it is the less 3D it tends to get with an OVF. That is where an EVF comes in handy. Also, I do believe it is related to pixel-count of the EVF. The more pixels, the more fluent the image becomes to the eye, as you can’t see the pixel edges, and hence more 3D if you like.
- Creative way: In what way is an EVF less creative? You can actually see what you get, unlike with an OVF. It gets even better when you can directly see the results of exposure adaptations, and any filters etc. you’d apply. That is virtually impossible with an OVF, and requires a lot of experience to get it right. Absolutely marvelous for e.g., B&W shooting.
- That is changinbg rapidly these days. I do not notice it on my EM-1 II or Pen-F at all, and I mostly use the EVF, not the screen. Neat feature: totally silent shooting Smile.

Very nice photograph, BTW! I really like it, and I think it is one of your best.

Kind regards, Wim
Gear: a gaggle of Canon primes, a lone Canon zoom (sold 5D II recently Smile), an accessory plague, and an Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II, Pen F and Panasonic GM5 with 14 primes, 8 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ....
#8
I never understood why such a large lens has such high levels of vignetting; and high bookeh fringing. Seems to me the otis is a better lens - when talking about just lens design; but maybe i'm confused ?
#9
Oh, and "You should also be able to notice that the focus point does NOT shift when stopping down."
You mean, the focus plane does not shift.
#10
BC, you stole my evil proofreader hat pen. Smile
  


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