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RF 15-35mm f2.8, RF 24-70mm f2.8, RF 70-200mm f2.8 prices
#11
(08-27-2019, 06:02 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: ...
On the grand scheme of Fuji X, I see (on the interweb) many who tried them once or for years change back to for instance Canon or Nikon for many reasons (among them problematic artifacts with RAW conversions due to the chosen CFA, colours, firmware/bugs/performance, UI, desire for FF).

The artifacts got a lot better when using the dedicated Capture One Fuji-version. But the UI and the button resistance were/are weak points. I'm not entirely happy with Nikon's layout and function buttons , but on Fujis I never managed to develop sympathy for.

One hint of Fujifilm's inconsequent design is the new GFX100 layout. Although the body would be big enough to host a ton of dials and buttons, Fujifilm now went with a top-display which is cheaper and more versatile. The histogram in a separate display would also be very helpful if it was a true RAW-histogram. Instead they went the simpler JPG way...

But what me really turnt off a lot is the unbelievably ignorant behaviour of some die-hard Fuji fans. The cameras would have to be masterpieces of phototechnic to remain in this weird world of "alternate reality".
#12
Officval princing is known for 24-70L IS and 15-35L IS: they are $2299 each.
https://www.canonrumors.com/specificatio...f-2-8l-is/

Not bad going if you’d ask me.
Now the wait is for the first few assessments / reviews.

Kind regards, Wim
Gear: Canon EOS R with 3 primes and 1 zoom, 4 EF-R adapters, Canon EOS 5 (analog), 9 Canon EF primes, a lone Canon EF zoom, 2 extenders, 2 converters, extension tubes, an accessory plague, and an Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II and Pen F with 12 primes, 6 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ...
#13
Nikkor Z 24-70mm f2.8 S: 17 elements, 805 grams.
Sony FE 24-70mm f2.8 GM: 18 elements, 886 grams (More expensive than the Nikkor in Euros/NL).

Canon RF 24-70mm f2.8L IS USM: 22 elements (!), 900 grams.
#14
And while we're at it and it is a nice mirrorless system: Panasonic 24-70/2.8, 18 elements, 935 grams and a steal for just 2.2 k$, in the 
LLLLLLL-mount Alliance and LLLLLLLeica-certified (whatever that means...) (gosh, it's really hard to imagine that L-word without the Earth shattering amateur camera effects provided by Mr. Jared Polin).  Big Grin

Just saw a nice video about the Panasonic S1H which will wet videographers pants as it comes with a fan to master the heat of 6k video FF. Wow. Never saw a YT video with more technical data in it.  Undecided Not that I've understood a word, but it was entertaining.
#15
(08-27-2019, 06:30 PM)Brightcolours Wrote: Nikkor Z 24-70mm f2.8 S: 17 elements, 805 grams.
Sony FE 24-70mm f2.8 GM: 18 elements, 886 grams (More expensive than the Nikkor in Euros/NL).

Canon RF 24-70mm f2.8L IS USM: 22 elements (!), 900 grams.
Prices in the Netherlands:

2105 euros - Sony FE 24-70mm f2.8 GM: 18 elements, 886 grams (More expensive than the Nikkor in Euros/NL).
2499 euros - Nikkor Z 24-70mm f2.8 S: 17 elements, 805 grams
2349 euros - Canon RF 24-70mm f2.8L IS USM: 22 elements (!), 900 grams (expected based on $2299 USA price)

And while we're at it:
2599 euros - Sony FE 16-35mm F/2.8 GM: 16 elements, 680 grams
2499 euros - Nikkor Z 16-35mm f2.8 S (expected price based on Nikon AF-S 17-35mm F/2.8 iF ED, as this needs another mm, and the price of the Nikon AF-S 24-70mm VR F/2.8E ED compared to Nikkor Z 24-70)
2349 euros - Canon RF 15-35mm f2.8L IS USM: 16 elements, 840 grams (expected price based on $2299 USA price)

From this POV, they are not cheap, but not the most expensive either.

Kind regards, Wim
Gear: Canon EOS R with 3 primes and 1 zoom, 4 EF-R adapters, Canon EOS 5 (analog), 9 Canon EF primes, a lone Canon EF zoom, 2 extenders, 2 converters, extension tubes, an accessory plague, and an Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II and Pen F with 12 primes, 6 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ...
#16
(08-27-2019, 06:02 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: Canon always has, and rightfully so, taken the position that lens IS is a better solution, and Canon ALSO has communicated from the start of the EOS R introduction that they are working on also offering in-body IS, which you must be aware of.

Once they have a professional durable 1-series implementation it will appear, to work in conjunction with lens IS.

The NEX-7 has those problematic corners, so replacing it with no matter which model will be a good idea, if you want to test any E mount APS-C lenses that is.

On the grand scheme of Fuji X, I see (on the interweb) many who tried them once or for years change back to for instance Canon or Nikon for many reasons (among them problematic artifacts with RAW conversions due to the chosen CFA, colours, firmware/bugs/performance, UI, desire for FF).

Canon is - undoubtedly - the manufacturer with the best lenses. 
And they are - undoubtedly - the manufacture that never had the best cameras. Nikon DSLRs were pretty much always better (less so Nikkor lenses).

There's the DR issue and, yes, after more than a decade of in-body IS on the market, they still don't have anything in place. Eventually, they will but as of today, we are talking about vapourware.
Even the M6 II doesn't have it - despite the fact that it's easier to implement in-body IS based on a smaller sensor.

Regarding the NEX7 & corners - back in the days I tested it vs the A6000 and the A6000 was not improved. The corner performance suffers in the MTFs because 24mp are just too much for most lenses (just as 50mp are too much for most DSLR lenses). FWIW, I will blow off the dust of the NEX7 for a new test of an exotic next week ;-)

Fuji colours - strangely most reviewers love them. ;-) Performance? Sony is faster, yes, Canon M is not. The UI is clearly a matter of taste. Sony's UI sucks but they are still the mirrorless leader.
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
#17
No. If a user needs twice the time to get settings ready, it's not a matter of taste but of missing logic. There are usability tests and there are guidelines of how to do and how to don't. Ignoring them doesn't help any manufacturer. Not cleaning them up, either.

Packing gazillions of features into the firmware is not necessarily helpful or better than reduce them to what is needed (and not to make a large list of features). Especially Sony would have the manpower and experience, but I reckon there's a Japanese special style for toys, not tools.
#18
The UI question is not so easy. The EOS R is a good example. As mentioned some time back, it's terrible to use out of the box - FOR ME. Following some customizations, it worked greate - FOR ME.
I never had issues with Fujis but then your mileage may vary. Conversely, I never warmed up with Nikon DSLRs.
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
#19
Sure, it very much depends which part of the UI I need and how often. But in terms of logical order I don't think formatting the card belongs to user settings... Also, calling "frames" (for "picture") in German translation "Rahmen" is simply the same like "I don't give a damn wether you understand or not". Olympus' UI is also known as very complicated, but the Fuji guys so far mark the top of non-usability.

At Nikon, at least all dials and buttons have a use. At Fuji, the front-dial is wasted money because of the aperture ring. Yes. few lenses don't have one, but these are not the lenses used on cameras with front dials.
#20
See - I never use the aperture ring on the lens on Fujis ;-)
Probably a reminiscence from my old Canon days.
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
  


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