Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
A7RII?
#1
Hi, The A7RII is being heavily discounted now. Review seem to suggest image quality is as good at the A7RIII at half the price.

Thinking it would be great for landscapes/stills with a three or four primes in the 18-85mm range. The Samyang AF f/2.8 lenses in this range seem to get decent reviews and the prices are right.

Another option is the Tamron or Tokina in the 16-28ish range? The Tokina is an EF sold with mount converter. When my Canon gear was heisted I was left with an my Canon portrait combo; 85/1.2 and 100/2. Both fine lenses that may work on with that converter. Then perhaps add a 35mm to fill the gap. I know I'm off on a tangent now...

Thoughts or comments? I keep feeling like I'm missing something because it's so much less that the RIII? Is the R3 worth the extra $1.2k? Do you have better suggestions for (budget but quality) lenses in the ~18-85mm ranges?

Thanks so much!
#2
I'm still using the mk II for the testing. Generally no complaints. The AF may be a little slow by the latest standards.

I think the Sigma 85/1.4 is an obvious buy. The Sigma 45mm is also lovely - albeit slow. The Samyangs feel cheap in my book but yes, they have also a low price tag.
The Sony 20 is currently here for testing ...
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
#3
If you are considering getting Tokina 16-28f2.8, you should know that optically it doesn't disappoint, however it is a brick: big and heavy and has a protruding front element that will prohibit filters use, I own it but rarely use it.
As for adapting Canon gear on Sony, I don't think it's a great idea unless you are using Sigma or metabones newest adapters but they are expensive and A7ii won't be the cheap option anymore...as an owner of Canon EOS RP, I can assure you it's an excellent camera,in real world use, I never complained of the dynamic range story, anyway if you insist on dynamic range and pulling shadows the EOS R is IMHO much netter than A7ii and won't cost much more than A7ii plus good adapter, autofocus with fast primes and eye detection are by far better than what A7ii would offer you
#4
I can't think of any reason for using adapters on Sony cameras really ...

The Zeiss 16-35mm f/4 OSS is pretty good in the ultra-wide zoom segment for instance. And beyond that is the Sony 12-24/4 and the Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
#5
(09-26-2020, 12:47 AM)Klaus Wrote: I can't think of any reason for using adapters on Sony cameras really ...

The Zeiss 16-35mm f/4 OSS is pretty good in the ultra-wide zoom segment for instance. And beyond that is the Sony 12-24/4 and the Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8

It does seem like a lot of Sony lenses get less than spectacular reviews. 

I'm not that interested in using an adapter really. I thought it was interesting the Tokina, at least in the US, is actually sold paired with a Sigma adapter for a very good price. Their solution to not having a UW for the Sony? 

The Zeiss 16-35/4 OSS does look interesting and covers the main range I'm interested in. Does OSS work with the 5-axis IS in the A7RII?
#6
I'd suggest to go hold, handle and operate a A7R II first, to see if you not dislike how it operates (menus, controls) and such. It may be "cheap", but it must suit you besides a now low price, too.
#7
(09-26-2020, 03:49 AM)mike Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 12:47 AM)Klaus Wrote: I can't think of any reason for using adapters on Sony cameras really ...

The Zeiss 16-35mm f/4 OSS is pretty good in the ultra-wide zoom segment for instance. And beyond that is the Sony 12-24/4 and the Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8

It does seem like a lot of Sony lenses get less than spectacular reviews. 

I'm not that interested in using an adapter really. I thought it was interesting the Tokina, at least in the US, is actually sold paired with a Sigma adapter for a very good price. Their solution to not having a UW for the Sony? 

The Zeiss 16-35/4 OSS does look interesting and covers the main range I'm interested in. Does OSS work with the 5-axis IS in the A7RII?

Sony isn't exactly vocal about the existence of sync/dual IS. 
At least I've never seen any table with related f-stop gains. 
Therefore I wouldn't place any bets on this.

The only real disappointment, as far as lenses are concerned, is the Zeiss 24-70mm f/4 in my book - although it's probably fine on 24mp sensors. The 50/1.8 is also soso but then it's cheap. And the 28-70mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS is crap.

The majority of Sony's APS-C lenses are ... bleh.

However, the Sony G lenses are pretty much all very good and reasonably priced. The GMs are great but too expensive IMHO.

(09-26-2020, 06:12 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: I'd suggest to go hold, handle and operate a A7R II first, to see if you not dislike how it operates (menus, controls) and such. It may be "cheap", but it must suit you besides a now low price, too.

I've criticized the shape of Sony cameras quite often in the past but the controls and the menu system are fine really.

Honestly, I don't get the whining about the menu system. There are actually TWO - like in most mirrorless cameras.
The main menu may be not optimal - but I couldn't care less really. I access the main menu pretty much just once following the purchase and thereafter only for sensor cleaning/firmware upgrades/card formatting. During field sessions, I use the quick menu (AF/MF modes, fps/timer, ISO, WB, DR etc.)  and that's pretty much enough except for exotic use cases. The quick menu system is perfectly Ok. Maybe it's different for video - I can't really comment on that one - but for photography I have no real complaints there. But, of course, that's just me.

So yes, it makes sense to handle the camera to make sure that you can live with the grip and the edgy design - and check whether the AF is good enough for you.
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
#8
(09-26-2020, 06:57 AM)Klaus Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 03:49 AM)mike Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 12:47 AM)Klaus Wrote: I can't think of any reason for using adapters on Sony cameras really ...

The Zeiss 16-35mm f/4 OSS is pretty good in the ultra-wide zoom segment for instance. And beyond that is the Sony 12-24/4 and the Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8

It does seem like a lot of Sony lenses get less than spectacular reviews. 

I'm not that interested in using an adapter really. I thought it was interesting the Tokina, at least in the US, is actually sold paired with a Sigma adapter for a very good price. Their solution to not having a UW for the Sony? 

The Zeiss 16-35/4 OSS does look interesting and covers the main range I'm interested in. Does OSS work with the 5-axis IS in the A7RII?

Sony isn't exactly vocal about the existence of sync/dual IS. 
At least I've never seen any table with related f-stop gains. 
Therefore I wouldn't place any bets on this.

The only real disappointment, as far as lenses are concerned, is the Zeiss 24-70mm f/4 in my book - although it's probably fine on 24mp sensors. The 50/1.8 is also soso but then it's cheap. And the 28-70mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS is crap.

The majority of Sony's APS-C lenses are ... bleh.

However, the Sony G lenses are pretty much all very good and reasonably priced. The GMs are great but too expensive IMHO.

(09-26-2020, 06:12 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: I'd suggest to go hold, handle and operate a A7R II first, to see if you not dislike how it operates (menus, controls) and such. It may be "cheap", but it must suit you besides a now low price, too.

I've criticized the shape of Sony cameras quite often in the past but the controls and the menu system are fine really.

Honestly, I don't get the whining about the menu system. There are actually TWO - like in most mirrorless cameras.
The main menu may be not optimal - but I couldn't care less really. I access the main menu pretty much just once following the purchase and thereafter only for sensor cleaning/firmware upgrades/card formatting. During field sessions, I use the quick menu (AF/MF modes, fps/timer, ISO, WB, DR etc.)  and that's pretty much enough except for exotic use cases. The quick menu system is perfectly Ok. Maybe it's different for video - I can't really comment on that one - but for photography I have no real complaints there. But, of course, that's just me.

So yes, it makes sense to handle the camera to make sure that you can live with the grip and the edgy design - and check whether the AF is good enough for you.

Thanks for the input. 

I'm not really worried about the menus. People say the same thing about the olys. I tend to set it and forget it. Most of it anyway. My concern is more the glass I can get.

I'm not giving up on mft by any means. That will still be my grab and go system. My thought for the Sony is a hi-res landscape camera. Thus why I'm looking at UWs. Therefore, I'm not really worried about shape. 

Likewise with AF. I'm sure the latest is better, and next generation will be even better. In real use, regardless of reviewers comments,  I'm surprised how few (next to none) out of focus captures I get with the PenF. It seemed an improvement to me compared to the Canon's I had owned.
#9
OK, I picked up a a7rii with <5k shutter actuations. It's immaculate! I found a package deal; Innorel baseplate/arca tripod clamp, Sigma mc-11, a dual charger and three batteries for a ridiculous price

I'm impressed with the design of the Innorel arca-baseplate/extender. If you're going to put a release plate on your camera, I can't see not going this style. It's a very well designed unit.

The mc-11 works pretty good with the Canon 85/1.8. It could hunt a tad in tricky situations. Still, very acceptable for a portrait lens. The 100/2 doesn't AF at all with it. But the aperture does work. Maybe I'll sell this one. I realized that when my canon gear was stolen, they missed my old sigma 70-200/2.8 ex (usm but no IS). This lens, as you would hope/expect, works flawlessly. Too bad they stole the collar.... Will need to order one off ebay.

For what I do, I have no complaints with the AF speed. Works very well, even in low light. As reviews said, battery life is kind of blah. That's not a show stopper as it doesn't effect the intended purpose of the camera - mostly landscape/streetscape. My initial though is 42Mp will meet and/or exceed my needs:-)

Coming in tomorrow is the Sony 24-105/4 g oss. Can't wait to get my hands on it:-). The autumn colors are in full bloom. So I can't wait to take it out.

My only thought now to complete the kit is to add a prime in 18mm range.
#10
The 24-105G is pretty great.

The review of the 20G should be up next week ...
Chief Editor - opticallimits.com

Doing all things Canon, MFT, Sony and Fuji
  


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread:
Kodachrome 25, 1 Guest(s)