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Birding in Costa Rica: Which Camera+Lens
#11
(06-07-2021, 05:04 AM)Arthur Macmillan Wrote:  
I have to look into the Sony. Do the use the same mount for Full frame and APS-C? I used to hear that their lenses were pricy. Is Sony still developing it's APS-C mirrorless cameras, or is it a dead end as far as moving into the future? Sony is a relative unknown for me. I like them, but I can't keep up with their new offerings. And their specifications that keep moving towards infinity...So the have an EVF now with 9 1/2 millon dots? So their FF sensor is now 63 MB? Or is that already obsolete?
 
Where would one jump in with Sony? (Can the Sigma 150-650 be purchased that natively has the Sony Mount? Adapters are sort of tiresome to me.
 
Thanks in advance!
 
-Mac

   Hi Mac ....... you added weatherproofing as a top requirement ...... the trouble there is, how weatherproof are say the D500 or the 90D for that matter? ........ I know that they are resistant to a point but the battery door on the D500 doesn't inspire me ....... Olympus are supposed to be pretty good in that respect but then it falls down a little in terms of noise. 
  For around three grand:  the Sony A6600 (APSC sensor) ....... I would couple it with the Sony 200-600mm zoom (F5-6.3)  very sharp and very manageable .... it has bird's eye detect and it heralded Sony's very clever AF in A9 !!

 here's a link:

https://www.thephoblographer.com/2020/07...n-or-snow/


    Or, for under a grand, maybe the Tamron G2 on the Canon 90D (it's better than the Sigma contemporary btw) which has weather resistance and take some sort of rain protection .... I carry a couple of dustbin bags in my backpack ...... certainly one of the cheapest options as you already have the camera ........ depends what you budget you have in mind and how long you intend to spend in Costa Rica ....... 

  Some things to think about there at any rate ........


all the best

daves cliches
Dave's clichés
#12
(06-07-2021, 05:04 AM)Arthur Macmillan Wrote:
(06-07-2021, 01:02 AM)Arthur Macmillan Wrote: Ah, Wim, you were responding about the 100-400 Mk I. The names I have heard to describe the two different zoom systems are "one touch" for the combined ring as in the Mark I, and "two touch" for the two ring style that is as far as I know virtually all modern lenses now use. I still own at least three lenses that are of "one touch" design. They are all manual focus lenses, though.
 
I like shooting birds in flight (BIFs).
 
Usually I start with AI Servo focus, lens at 100mm, and if I can keep the focus point anywhere near the bird as I zoom ring, the lens stays in focus. The big problem: Getting from 100mm to 400mm and staying on the bird is no mean feat!
 
You've given me a big clue though! I have been keeping the zoom ring tension at maximum to prevent zoom creep. It never occurred to me to set the ring tension to minimum while I was shooting BIF, and then tighten it back up for travel.
 
You've done it again, Wim. I believe this will be a big improvement! Thank you!
 
-Mac

It's only a pleasure, Mac!

BTW, the 100-400 Mk I is also better at close focus, i.e., sharper, than the Mk II in macro range. I used both with the Canon 500D achromat close-up lens. Works extremely well, the Mk I goes to 1:1 with it, the II to 1:1.25, higher magnification IOW, but the Mk I is sharper at these magnifications.

Kind regards, Wim
Gear: Canon EOS R with 3 primes and 2 zooms, 4 EF-R adapters, Canon EOS 5 (analog), 9 Canon EF primes, a lone Canon EF zoom, 2 extenders, 2 converters, tubes; Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II & Pen F with 12 primes, 6 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ....
#13
To Dave, Klaus, and everyone:  Thanks for your help.  I have to apologize for jumping all over, changing brands and requirements.  What has happened, really, is that as I read the reviews on various systems, I begin to loose sight of the original premise.  Which early on I thing you guys were on target with.  Namely, Cindy needs a camera that will perform as well as the 5D Mark IV, but not cost more.  Reach is a necessity, Low light performance is a necessity.

But I can help getting sidetracked, sorry.

One thing I found interesting was Sony's BSI (back side illumination) That sounds like a good low light enhancement.  I have mixed fillings about elimination of the anti-aliasing filter.  It does seem like it would also improve low light performance.

I really only know Canon cameras, so a lot of these innovations sound good...but are they.

Something I am familiar with is Canon's habit of only producing high end lenses in the FF format, and then you are free to use them on crop sensors.  But what happened to the idea of smaller lenses.

That is perhaps an area some of these makers.  Certainly Panasonic, and Olympus have delivered the goods.  I don't mind the weight of my 100-400 Mk II, I am a little less happy about the prospect of carrying a larger prime lens that could be a lot smaller if it were scaled to the sensor. 

On the other hand Sigma has made much smaller, and cheaper versions of lenses for APS-C.  So far as I know no one is offering a fast Telephoto prime at a lower price for the smaller formats.

So I guess Super Zoom on APS-C or MFT is where this is headed.

Am I correct that Sony is the low light king?

+++++++++++++++++++
@ Dave M., "....is the 500D really any better?...Well finally something I have experience with.  I owned the 500D for 4 years in the Santa Cruz mountains where it is extremely wet!  I never had even the hint of a problem!  I also had the 350D, and the 400D in much wetter conditions.  They were fine.  The battery door doesn't bother me, it is not likely to get wet and there is nothing to really short there anyway.  The battery contacts are on top of the battery.  Compare that to TWO recent xxD cameras that had a few tiny droplets land on the camera and they power down.  I cant really accuse Canon of lowering the build quality of their cameras, other than to say my own experience is that the rebels, in more ways than on out preformed my more recent.  70D and 90D.  I may have take 500,000 photos with the 500D.  Standing in creeks, on the banks of creeks, and muddy, rainy, windy weather.  If I think it is better quality than a two camera's that did not even make it one year before acting up before one year is up, can you blame me.  There.  I've said it.  The build quality does not compare as far as I am concerned.  Sorry, but you did ask.

I really didn't want to end up in Sony's camp, but there do seem to be a lot to recommend them.  Their APSC Models may just be the dark horse here!  Take care,

-Mac

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Hi, Wim-

You are the ultimate perfectionist!  You may know that I have the 1.4 Mark III teleconverter, and that auto focus remains functional, at least for the center point and Canon's better, and more recent models.  I believe 7D MkII, the 80 and 90D, and the high end FF models.  I mention this because multiply the native magnification x 1.4 and you get somewhere around 0.42 magnification.  That is really good combined with a discrete distance between you and your subject, so really, that was on of my first tests.  I admit I was not overly impressed.  But it does sort of grow on you, in terms of you are just walking around shooting pics of birds, and you see a row of barnacles on a log that are the size of baseballs!  Or a crab, or jellyfish, or a shell.  It might not be what we consider macro, but it still a size that would be a lot less well handled by most lenses.  I think it does pretty well if not at it's stated limit, but just a little backed off.  But the optical IS it really the big thing for me! 

Take care, Wim,

-Mac

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks everyone!  I really do think I know were to look now!  I think I am getting close!

-Mac

Fujifilm cameras have promise.

Sorry Dave, you said D500, not 500D!  But still, the D500 is considered a professional camera, is it not.  I expect that it pretty well sealed, although I am just guessing.

The D500 and Nikon's 200-500 are really widely used in birding.  But you favored the 150-600mm G2.  That actually tells me a lot!  I've seen your photos, as you know.  I guess following your lead would not be the worst thing to do!

And reasonable to predict that the same thing would apply to the APS-C Canon's.  But that's another story.


-Mac
#14
There is very little difference with higher ISO performance between the latest Sony APS-C camera (A6600), the Canon EOS 90D, and the Nikon D500.
If you want the best higher ISO performance, you need to look at the new and very expensive Pentax K3 III. It outperforms the rest by very smart noise reduction in the electronics themselves.

But you could also look at better noise reduction in post processing.

FF gives better high ISO performance in general, because the sensor is bigger. This also means you get less reach (no sensor based crop) and more shallow DOF at the same aperture.

MTF performs less than APS-C.

You do not need the best rain protection for bird images, as you do not go out to photograph them in the rain. And while transporting equipment in the rain, the camera bag is the protection. And yes, the Tamron 150-600mm G2 also works the same on a Canon 90D, for example.

Those are the basic rules, and you seem to overcomplicate things a lot, resulting in running around in circles.
#15
(06-07-2021, 10:42 PM)Arthur Macmillan Wrote: +++++++++++++++++++
@ Dave M., "....is the 500D really any better?...Well finally something I have experience with.  I owned the 500D for 4 years in the Santa Cruz mountains where it is extremely wet!  I never had even the hint of a problem!  I also had the 350D, and the 400D in much wetter conditions.  They were fine.  The battery door doesn't bother me, it is not likely to get wet and there is nothing to really short there anyway.  The battery contacts are on top of the battery.  Compare that to TWO recent xxD cameras that had a few tiny droplets land on the camera and they power down.  I cant really accuse Canon of lowering the build quality of their cameras, other than to say my own experience is that the rebels, in more ways than on out preformed my more recent.  70D and 90D.  I may have take 500,000 photos with the 500D.  Standing in creeks, on the banks of creeks, and muddy, rainy, windy weather.  If I think it is better quality than a two camera's that did not even make it one year before acting up before one year is up, can you blame me.  There.  I've said it.  The build quality does not compare as far as I am concerned.  Sorry, but you did ask.

I really didn't want to end up in Sony's camp, but there do seem to be a lot to recommend them.  Their APSC Models may just be the dark horse here!  Take care,

-Mac

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Sorry Dave, you said D500, not 500D!  But still, the D500 is considered a professional camera, is it not.  I expect that it pretty well sealed, although I am just guessing.

The D500 and Nikon's 200-500 are really widely used in birding.  But you favored the 150-600mm G2.  That actually tells me a lot!  I've seen your photos, as you know.  I guess following your lead would not be the worst thing to do!

And reasonable to predict that the same thing would apply to the APS-C Canon's.  But that's another story.


-Mac

   Hi Mac ....... I can't say enough about the D500 ...... it's the best birding APSc DSLR ever !! ....... it's designed expressly for rapidity in focus acquisition with an instant choice of four focusing modes at the touch of a button ..... great viewfinder and excellent rear tilting screen ....... it's super fast and never ever leaves you waiting ........ never ever !!
  I'm going to shoot for the rest of my days with it   ... simply !!  

Following MLCs is just a side interest for me ....... like keeping up with SpaceX  ... SmileSmile
   
Seriously Mac ...... I don't think you would go far wrong with the G2 on the 90D ...... both IQ wise and financially !!

(06-08-2021, 06:35 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: There is very little difference with higher ISO performance between the latest Sony APS-C camera (A6600), the Canon EOS 90D, and the Nikon D500.
If you want the best higher ISO performance, you need to look at the new and very expensive Pentax K3 III. It outperforms the rest by very smart noise reduction in the electronics themselves.

But you could also look at better noise reduction in post processing.

FF gives better high ISO performance in general, because the sensor is bigger. This also means you get less reach (no sensor based crop) and more shallow DOF at the same aperture.

MTF performs less than APS-C.

You do not need the best rain protection for bird images, as you do not go out to photograph them in the rain. And while transporting equipment in the rain, the camera bag is the protection. And yes, the Tamron 150-600mm G2 also works the same on a Canon 90D, for example.

   

Those are the basic rules, and you seem to over complicate things a lot, resulting in running around in circles.

  I've been following the results from the K3 III BC ..... and unfortunately it's not quite living up to the expectations that many were counting on ..... certainly the BIF images I've seen don't ! ..... however, the BIF lenses are just not there excepting the 150-450mm zoom lens .....
  In DSLR land for BIF nothing's changed, it's still between Canon and Nikon !!




Rainfall in Costa Rica:

https://jameskaiser.com/costa-rica-guide...ny-season/


they get up to 260 inches of rain a year !! ........ that's way above chest height ....... Smile

That will put any weather proofing to the test !!
Dave's clichés
#16
During those rains, the equipement stays in the bags/hotels, when birding ;-), so perhaps not
#17
(06-08-2021, 10:00 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: During those rains, the equipement stays in the bags/hotels, when birding ;-), so perhaps not

  Does it ?? ........ I see it as being out in glorious conditions miles from the hotel taking great colourful birding images  when all of a sudden .......

......  BERBATABOOM ...... and you get 4 inches of rain in an hour that just came out of the blue !!

Perhaps Mac will tell us how it is ??
Dave's clichés
#18
Does the bag stay in that hotel? :-P
#19
I've only encountered one situation when weather sealing was (very) useful.
I was in the mountains shooting landscapes and tiny critters with my father.
Back then, I had a Pentax K10D + Pentax DA* 16-50 f2.8. Body and lens were both weather sealed.
My father had a K10D + Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4.5. Only the body was weather sealed.
There was a bit of pollen in the air from pine trees. We didn't really pay attention and kept shooting without taking any special precaution as the pollen was not so noticeable anyway.
Later on at home, my father changed lens. The inside of his camera was... yellow! Tons of pollen had gotten inside. He had to send the camera back to Pentax to be fully cleaned.
On the other hand, my camera inside was spotless.

These days, I almost exclusively use non-sealed Fuji bodies and lenses. I often go on vacation to the beach as we do quite a bit of kitesurfing. Taking kitesurfing pics or the kids at the beach, even in very windy condition, I've never encountered any issue with sand or water. Of course, I'm careful with my gear but I don't use bags or anything.

As to shooting in the rain, it probably never occurs (or rarely) unless you're a pro that must be shooting regardless of the weather condition.
--Florent

Flickr gallery
#20
(06-08-2021, 10:48 AM)Brightcolours Wrote: Does the bag stay in that hotel? :-P

....... Mine wouldn't !!

Why, would yours?? .........
Dave's clichés
  


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